Leaf Removal

Removal vs. Mulching in Turf

As summer comes to an end, so does the tree growing season. As fall approaches, property managers are left with a decision to make. Should fallen leaves be mulched or removed? When it comes to leaf removal it may be tempting to wait until all the leaves have fallen; however, it is much better for the overall health of your lawn to remove them as soon as possible. Leaves can also cause safety issues as fallen leaves on pavements, parking lots, and patios can be slippery when wet and lead to accidents.

While both methods have their benefits, in most cases, mulching leaves is more cost-efficient than leaf removal. Mulching leaves can also act as a natural fertilizer and a beneficial organic matter, which will improve the overall health of the soil. Another benefit is water conservation, as leaf mulching helps retain moisture in the soil. Additionally, the leaf mulch lowers the soil’s exposure to the sun and wind, reducing evaporation. Leaf mulches also reduce weeds on a property, in turn reducing the amount of weeding or the need to use herbicides to maintain the property in the spring. A disadvantage to this method is that mulching diseased leaves can spread disease. Too many mulched leaves can starve your grass and plants of light and air and encourage pests.

Similarly, leaf removal also comes with advantages and disadvantages. One of the main benefits of leaf removal is that it promotes better growth. Cleaning up the leaves allows sunlight to get into the grass, helping with the overall growth. The downside of not removing fallen leaves is that the area will stay damp, leading to mold, fungus, and diseases that will damage your grass. The leaves remaining on a property can invite mosquitoes and other insects that will eat the roots of your grass, leading to several types of lawn disease. Overall, removal services in the fall will reduce the amount of time and save money on lawn services that may be needed in the spring.

Three Things I Learned About The Landscaping Industry

Joining the landscape industry has been a new learning experience and after 3 years I’m still learning. Coming from a corporate IT background I never knew what went into working for a landscaping company.

While all properties are different, they all are looking to accomplish the same goal. Each property’s requirements vary based on its region. Whether you are looking at a high-rise in DC with a green roof and planters on the ground level, a gated HOA in McLean, or a new developing apartment community in Richmond, they are all looking to accomplish the same goal, curb appeal! While working on apartment communities in DC you will see many greens. In Herndon, you don’t see that very often but you do see more outdoor spaces, for example, dog parks and trails. I have learned that we need to be able to hear all of our customer’s needs and take into consideration the location.  Landscaping at Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Coming from a corporate background new to the landscape industry I have learned that It’s a team effort from beginning to end. When it comes to preparing a proposal for a customer many parts go into the planning that I was not aware of. Starting with the initial meeting with the customer to internally estimating the property, the team physically estimating the property to finally presenting to the customer. Everyone in the team plays a big role in presenting each proposal specifically designed for each of our customers.

In my first year, I didn’t understand why there was so much conversation around snow removal. Coming from a completely different industry I would have never imagined the role that snow plays in the landscape industry. After sitting in on an operations meeting I understand all the planning that goes into a snow event. Assigning crew members and vehicles to each customer’s specific snow requirements takes a lot of preparation. Also the continued treatment of the properties throughout and after a storm. Snow is a big part of the landscape industry in Northern Virginia during the winter months. 

These are only a few of the many things I have learned while working at Chapel Valley.