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6 landscaping trends you ll want to try in 2017Much like hairdressers know which bobs and weaves will be big this season, landscapers know which hedges and patio sets are poised to take off.

Every year, the National Association of Landscape Professionals gathers insight on consumer demand from its 100,000 members and marries it with research on lifestyle preferences and technological innovations.

The result is a report of trends reflecting what’s all the rage in outdoor living. Here are six of trending design ideas you may want to adopt in 2017.

1. Taking the Hygge Outside

Hygge (pronounced “hoo-gah”) is a Danish concept centered around feeling cozy is transitioning outside. Now that temperatures are warming, the idea can still be incorporated in your outdoor space numerous ways. For example, consider installing a fire pit or a focal point where family and friends can gather. Swap out your picnic table for a circular seating nook that encourages intimate conversations. Look for water features that produce a soothing soundtrack. The right plants and lighting can also add to the ambience. The goal is to walk into your yard and feel like you’re getting a hug. After all, hygge comes from the Norwegian word meaning hug.

2. More Sophisticated Backyard BBQs

Gone are the days when a Coleman grill and a bag of charcoal were all you needed for cooking outside. In 2017, more homeowners will up their BBQ game with complete outdoor kitchens including sophisticated appliances. Think cooking under LED lighting and surround sound controlled by your smart phone. Baking with al fresco ovens boasting WiFi and grabbing a beer from a touchscreen fridge that uses cameras to take inventory of its contents.

If you can’t afford to drop $6,000 on a stainless-steel fridge, don’t fret. It’s easy to enhance your outdoor culinary experience with elevated lighting and something as simple as a more convenient prepping station. For example, use a bar cart instead the top of your cooler.  

3. Purposefully Pollinating

As the population of bees continues to dramatically decline in the double digits, homeowners are beginning to proactively look for ways to create pollinator-friendly gardens. For example, they’re shying away from the use of pesticides and are planting more nectar-producing plants to naturally attract bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and other pollinators. It also helps to incorporate birdbaths and other sources of water which pollinators need to consume more frequently and in larger quantities than other insects and birds.

4. Gardens in the Sky

To reduce urban heat and improve storm water management, Denver is considering following Toronto’s lead in requiring buildings of a certain size to have living roofs. According to NALP, the “green roof” movement is spreading, from city skyscrapers to stadium restaurants, double-decker buses and everywhere in between. This trend most likely started abroad. In Switzerland, more than 18,000 plants live on the roof of a metro station, and above the Arctic Circle there is a snow and ice hotel whose roof doubles as its garden.

Although most common in commercial spaces, this trend can be implemented at home. The easiest way is to start small, perhaps with a few plants or a small terrace. Or if you have the space and budget, install turf and invite the neighbors over for a friendly game of croquet.

5. Smarter, More Selective Lawns

Thanks to new, more efficient irrigation methods like dripping and the selective breeding experiments of turfgrass seed producers, lawns are getting smarter. In this context, a smarter lawn is a healthier lawn, often requiring less watering and maintenance. The best way to incorporate this trend into your yard is to talk with landscaping professionals who are privy to the latest developments and products.

Of course, if you prefer DIY, start with becoming familiar with your surroundings. Know the soil your climate produces and the native plants and flowers that require the least amount of nurturing and upkeep.

6. Greenery is In, and Outside

Every fall, designers wait with bated breath for Pantone to announce the color of the year. For 2017, the unofficial governing body of color theory has chosen “greenery.” So you can expect to see a greater emphasis placed on this yellowish-green and other shades that compliment it.

“Combining greenery of various textures and shades, such as a formal hedge of green velvet boxwood, a border of green lilyturf and dense Boston ivy-covered trellises, is just as impactful as a garden filled with a rainbow of colorful flowers,” says Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NALP. Henriksen says if homeowners can only invest the time and/or expense into one trend, greenery is a good choice.

“It’s timeless and universal. It can be integrated into any yard or garden, no matter your location, size or budget, year after year.”

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*This regularly-scheduled sponsored Q&A column is written by Eli Tucker, Arlington-based Realtor and Rosslyn resident. Please submit your questions to him via email for response in future columns.

Question:

I’m planning to sell my single family home in North Arlington this year and it seems that in my neighborhood, homes with great landscaping sell for top dollar. Our sale price justifies an investment in our lot, so I’m curious what the Arlington homebuyer demand from landscaping and if there are certain types of landscaping that offer the best Return on Investment.

Answer:

landscaping for resale and current trendsEvery spring I get a lot of landscaping questions and like to bring in my friend Jeff Minnich of Jeff Minnich Garden Designs to update Arlingtonians on what homeowners are doing in their yards and provide cost-effective tips for investing in your exterior for resale.

Enjoy Jeff’s expert response to this week’s question:

In Arlington, homeowners take great pride in their gardens. Our temperate climate is such that we can enjoy our gardens for the majority of the year. Over the last 15 years, there has been a trend toward extending the interior living space seamlessly into the outdoor living space–outdoor rooms, kitchens, fire pits, play areas, fencing, to name a few.  The desirability of a well-designed garden space is a solid investment, and attractive to potential Arlington homebuyers.

Most people involved in the landscape industry have seen a surge in business the last few years, as the economy recovers. This year is particularly busy.

There are really two kinds of investment in a home and garden: doing what will bring pleasure, enjoyment, and ease to day-to-day life in the home; and doing what might add value to the property, if resale is in the cards.

When preparing to sell a home in Arlington, it is important to remember that many buyers have the means and desire to put their own personal stamps on their new homes and gardens. Therefore, I always recommend concentrating on safety items, tidiness, and color.

Fix that uneven sidewalk or replace rotten wood on the deck. Fix gates. Replace the burnt out bulbs in your outdoor lighting system (lots of potential buyers drive by and have a look at night, too). Have the windows cleaned and check the exterior paint job, particularly the front door (yes, these items are part of the outdoor landscape, too). Power wash the house, sidewalks, patio, deck, driveway…make sure your hardscapes sparkle.

Weed, re-edge and mulch the planting beds. Remove old/dead shrubs and trim existing ones. Look up into your trees–does a tree or branch look dead or precarious? Have a tree professional look at it. Potential homebuyers do notice these things. Cut the grass and make sure your lawn is not full of blooming dandelions! This one item can be a big turn-off.

Finally, finish the job by adding some flowers to windowboxes, pots, and beds. Remember, you cannot take back that first impression–the outside of your home is the first thing potential buyers see before walking through the front door, and it can often make or break a sale.

Once new homeowners get settled on the inside, they start to ponder what to do in their new gardens.

The most common request from new homeowners is a master landscape plan, which is a great starting place so they can prioritize, then phase, the work they’d like to do, all within a broader vision.

Safety issues should be addressed quickly–items like unstable walks or decks, handrails; and the often boring, but absolutely necessary, issues like grading, drainage, and where to put trash cans.

Fencing is a relatively quick and easy project to prioritize early on, and fences can give instant privacy, keep children and pets in the yard, and define a space. Nice fencing is particularly attractive to potential buyers with these concerns.

Outdoor living spaces are the next most-desired items, and these often involve building. It’s always a good idea to start with hardscapes–patios, sidewalks, decks, porches, walls, outdoor kitchens, etc.–and end with softscapes–plants, lawns, lighting, irrigation–as construction is messy and, try as they might, workers can still damage plants and surrounding areas.

Privacy from fencing and thoughtful plantings can screen unsightly views and enclose outdoor spaces.

Those interested in safety might find low-voltage outdoor lighting desirable. Outdoor lighting opens up the garden for nighttime use, too, and can be used to highlight architecture, specimen plantings, or specific pieces within the landscape.

For those who often travel and have very busy schedules, an irrigation system is a must. It really takes the edge off watering duties, yet should never 100 percent replace a discriminating eye and hand-watering intervention when gardens get really hot and dry.

I often say my outdoor lighting gives me the nighttime and my irrigation system gives me freedom, so they are very valuable to me.

Beautiful plantings are the icing on the cake and tie everything together. Much of North Arlington is blessed with large shade trees — a big reason potential buyers consider North Arlington — and lush evergreen and deciduous underplantings help potential buyers imagine living in these outdoor spaces.

Without a doubt, garden projects that define and enclose personal outdoor spaces–things like fencing and nice gates, patios and seating areas, and beautiful plantings–are items that not only increase the day-to-day enjoyment of the homeowner, they greatly increase the value of the property, as well.

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winter landscaping preparations to make

Save yourself the agony of defeat come next spring with these helpful ideas to prepare your landscape for the winter season.

The following tips below will have your yard ready for the warmer weather following this winter:

  1. Overseed Lawn
  2. Compost Leaves in Yard
  3. Remove Annuals
  4. Mulch Perennials
  5. Prepare & Monitor Compost Pile

Check out the full article here on winter landscape prep.

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consider a natural curve for your landscape design

Nature is filled with many natural curves. These curves can benefit your landscape design ranging from patios, walkways, retaining walls, flowers, shrubbery, and tree placement.

There are many great ways to design a yard. One should use the natural curves of their existing landscape to their advantage. Your landscaping will appear natural and not "forced."

More ideads regarding natural curves can be found on Houzz's article.

 

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